Fall 2018 photos

Dayton's Monkey

No dinosaur in the world compares to The Field Museum's SUE—the largest, most complete, and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered. SUE is one of the highlights of The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, a brand new exhibit that showcases animals and plants as sophisticated machines that are built for survival. It opens on Friday, October 12 at the Science Museum of Minnesota.

© The Field Museum/John Weinstein, Neg. #GN 89714-2rdc

Dayton's Monkey

Why is the cheetah the fastest land animal? Because of its aerodynamic snout, its long, skinny tail for balance, claws that never retract and provide extra traction, and a spine that curls under for extra reach. Visitors to The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, which opens on Friday, October 12 at the Science Museum of Minnesota, will explore the ways that animals and plants are built for survival, like sophisticated biological machines.

© The Field Museum, Z95153_32Bd

Dayton's Monkey

The unique mandibles of this tiny trap-jaw ant allow it to quickly trap its prey with a bite that is more than two thousand times faster than the blink of an eye. In The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, visitors to the Science Museum of Minnesota will explore this amazing survival mechanism - along with many, many others. The exhibit opens on Friday, October 12.

© The Field Museum, Photo by Gracen Brilmyer

Dayton's Monkey

Visitors to the Mental Health: Mind Matters exhibit, now open at the Science Museum of Minnesota, experiment with letting their bodies convey their emotions. Through hands-on activities, multimedia components, and powerful video testimonials from people in our community who are living with mental illness, the exhibit gives visitors of all ages a safe space to explore the realities of mental illness and our history in treating it.

Photo courtesy of Science Museum of Minnesota.

Dayton's Monkey

The Mental Health: Mind Matters exhibit at the Science Museum of Minnesota uses hands-on activities and multimedia components to build empathy and awareness about mental illness. Here, a visitor tries out a pair of noise distorting headphones to experience the difficulties some people with symptoms of psychosis deal with if they’re unable to filter out some of the sounds that surround them.

Photo courtesy of Heureka, The Finnish Science Centre.

Dayton's Monkey

On Friday, October 12, Living in the Age of Airplanes makes its debut in the William L. McKnight-3M Omnitheater at the Science Museum of Minnesota. Filmed in 18 countries across all seven continents - including Antarctica - the film will give viewers a powerful giant screen look at the ways our lives have been impacted by the evolution of air travel.

Photo courtesy of National Geographic.

Dayton's Monkey

Living in the Age of Airplanes uses the Omnitheater's 90-foot domed screen to convey the the wonder and grandeur of flying and the ways that air travel has changed the way we live our lives. It opens on Friday, October 12.

Photo courtesy of National Geographic.

Dayton's Monkey

Not that long ago, traveling between continents was a migration. Now, on any given day, rapid technological and mechanical advancements have led to a world in which 100,000 flights transport people and products between any two points on Earth in a matter of hours. Visitors to the Science Museum of Minnesota will get a giant screen look at this remarkable achievement in engineering in Living in the Age of Airplanes, which opens Friday, October 12 in the William L. McKnight-3M Omnitheater.

Photo courtesy of National Geographic.

Dayton's Monkey

This fall, the Science Museum welcomes Dr. Alex Hastings as its new Fitzpatrick Chair of Paleontology. Visitors can meet him on Saturday, October 13 at Fossil Day. He'll introduce himself on the Atrium Stage at 10 a.m., followed by a meet-and-greet in the Dinosaurs and Fossils Gallery. Dr. Hastings will also participate in that day's Object ID event, where Science Museum experts will be on hand to help identify objects and specimens from the fields of biology, paleontology, geology, and North American archaeology.

Photo courtesy of Alex Hastings.

Dayton's Monkey

On Saturday, October 27, the popular Boo-ology event offers Science Museum visitors of all ages some hands-on science with a spooky spin! Festivities take place from noon to 4 p.m., and kids 12 and under who arrive in costume get in FREE!

Photo courtesy of Science Museum of Minnesota.

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