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Shallow Lakes

Researchers

Kevin Theissen, Alex Blel, Quinn Wrenholt, Sean Hagen, and Will Hobbs on a sediment coring trip

Kyle Zimmer

Kyle ZimmerKyle is an associate professor in the Biology Department at the University of St. Thomas in St Paul, MN. His research interests are in aquatic ecology, focused on understanding biotic and abiotic factors influencing alternative stable states in shallow lakes and wetlands. He's also interested in how turbid versus clear-water states in shallow lakes influence ecosystem properties such as carbon sequestration, biodiversity patterns, and nutrient cycles. Learn More


Kevin Theissen

Kevin TheissenKevin is an Associate Professor of Geology at the University of St. Thomas. His research focuses on the use of carbon and nitrogen elemental and stable isotopic values from sediments in the reconstruction of lake histories. Kevin is heading up our efforts to use these indicators as well as trace elements to explore the changing ecology of our study lakes. Learn More


Leah Domine

Leah DomineLeah is a postdoctoral associate at the University of St. Thomas. Her research seeks to evaluate how carbon cycling and burial in macrophyte and phytoplankton dominated shallow lakes are influenced by climate, watershed characteristics, food web dynamics, and the physical and chemical environment of the lakes. Leah is responsible for coordinating the field sampling trips, sample processing, and data analysis. She also advises undergraduate students working on independent research projects.


Jim Cotner

Jim CotnerJim has been studying nutrient dynamics and all things microbial in lakes (Great and not-as-great), and estuaries since the early 80s. His work on shallow lakes is focused on processes contributing to organic carbon burial and export, including the importance of macrophytes vs. phytoplankton as sources of organic matter and the degree of oxygen exposure. Learn More


Will Hobbs

Will HobbsWill started as a post-doctoral researcher with Kyle Zimmer, working on the paleoecology of the shallow impaired, Lake Christina. He is now an Associate Scientist at the St. Croix Watershed Research Station and has been involved with the field work and analysis of project sediment cores. His research interests broadly pertain to the biogeochemical responses of lakes to both climate and nutrient enrichment. Will continues to work on carbon burial in shallow lakes across Minnesota as a project collaborator. Learn More


Joy Ramstack Hobbs

Joy Ramstack HobbsJoy is an Associate Scientist at the St. Croix Watershed Research Station. Her research focuses on paleolimnology of shallow lakes, specifically using diatoms and geochemical markers to find shifts between turbid and clear states in the paleo record. Learn More


Mark Edlund

Mark EdlundMark is a Senior Scientist at the St. Croix Watershed Research Station. His research interests have developed around diatoms, which are used to investigate historical environmental change, biodiversity, and as tools for biomonitoring. Learn More


Alex Blel

Alex BlelAlex Blel graduated from the University of St. Thomas in May 2012 with an Environmental Science major; she now works at the Twin Cities environmental consulting firm Bay West. She has worked primarily with Dr. Kevin Theissen in both the field and laboratory and has contributed to our work on the paleoecology of our study lakes. Her projects have included the analysis of the sediment composition of shallow lake cores and the extraction of trace elements from shallow lake waters and sediments.


Charles Bruchu

Charles BruchuCharles is a 2012 UST graduate who earned his degree in Biology. He spent two summers working with Joy Ramstack Hobbs and Will Hobbs at the St. Croix Watershed Research Station. His work contributed to the paleolimnological portion of the project, with special focus on the sediment accumulation, biogenic silica record, and management history of Blakesley Lake. Charles is a co-author on a forthcoming paper with several of the project collaborators including undergraduates Sean Hagen and Ben Czeck.


Ben Czeck

Ben CzeckBen is a 2011 UST graduate who earned a B.S. in Geology. He worked with Dr. Theissen and contributed to work on collection of both past and modern data for the project during 2010-2011. Ben did focused work on extracting and exploring the trace metal history of Blakesley Lake and he is a co-author on a forthcoming paper with several of the project collaborators and undergraduates Sean Hagen and Charles Bruchu. Ben is currently working towards an M.S. degree in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.


Ann Goding

Ann GodingMy name is Ann Goding and I am a Junior at the University of St. Thomas. I am currently working on a project with Dr. Leah Domine and Dr. Kyle Zimmer looking at the carbon burial rates in shallow lakes. I am also working on an individual project that is looking at the effect of fathead minnows on carbon burial in lakes.


Sean Hagen

Sean HagennSean is a 2011 UST graduate who earned a B.S. in Environmental Science with a focus in Geology. He worked with Dr. Theissen and contributed to work on collection of both past and modern data for the project during 2010-2011. Sean did focused work on carbon and nitrogen elemental and stable isotopic records from Blakesley Lake and he is a co-author on a forthcoming paper with several of the project collaborators and undergraduates Ben Czeck and Charles Bruchu. Sean is currently working at a resort in Montana and applying to graduate programs.

Adrian Montes

Adrian MontesAs an undergraduate student at the University of St. Thomas and an active member of this NSF research team, Adrian has been able to learn valuable field and lab skills while simultaneously developing his understanding of shallow lake ecology, more specifically carbon cycling/burial within shallow lakes. Aside from the primary research, he also studied the effects of fathead minnows on carbon burial within shallow lakes. He is grateful for this opportunity as working on this project has both developed his science background and shaped valued friendships.


Dan Probst

Dan ProbstDan is an undergraduate senior at the University of St. Thomas and has been working with Kyle Zimmer and Leah Domine for the last two and half years. His degree is in neuroscience and he will be attending the University of Minnesota Medical School in the fall of 2012. His is researching the consumption of organic carbon in the form of detritus by fathead minnows. He's interested in learning how this consumption affects organic carbon sequestration rates in Minnesota shallow lakes. On the NSF project, he has been involved in many aspects of field data collection as well as lab work such as analyzing decomposing plants and performing water chemistry.


Rachel Rockwell

Rachel RockwellRachel is an undergraduate student working in Kyle Zimmer's lab at the University of St Thomas in St Paul, MN. Currently she is working on an independent project to determine whether macroinvertebrates play a significant role in the decomposition of plants and algae in shallow lakes. Litter bags containing terrestrial grass, Potamogeton pectinatus, cladophora and chara were deployed into twelve shallow lakes in central MN, and collected over the course of a year. Control bags allowed minimal colonization by macroinvertebrates, while experimental bags allowed further colonization of macroinvertebrates through the presence of larger holes of entry. She intends to observe what whole lake factors influence the decomposition of these plants and algae, and whether macroinvertebrates significantly contribute to the decomposition process.


Quinn Wrenholt

Quinn WrenholtQuinn is a senior Environmental Science major at the University of St. Thomas. In addition to helping as a lab technician and working as a field assistant to Dr. Theissen, his own project consisted of analyzing the sediment composition of different shallow lake cores using microscopy to look for evidence of historic changes in the ecology of the lakes.