RACE: Are We So Different?

About the Exhibit

VIEW THE RACE GALLERY HEREWe all know that people look different. Throughout history, those differences have been a source of strength, community and personal identity. They have also been the basis for discrimination and oppression.

And while those differences are socially and culturally real, contemporary scientific understanding of race and human variation is complex and may challenge how we think about it. RACE: Are We So Different? helps visitors understand what race is and what it is not. It gives them the tools to recognize racial ideas and practices in contemporary American life.

The exhibit explores three themes: the everyday experience of race, the contemporary science that is challenging common ideas about race, and the history of this idea in the United States.

Everyday Experience of Race
Race is embedded in virtually all aspects of American life. Explore social and personal experiences of race in familiar settings such as home and neighborhood, health and medicine, and education and schools. Discover that race and racism is not inside our heads, but in fact is built into our laws, traditions, and institutions.

The Science of Human Variation
Racial and ethnic categories, which have changed over time, are human-made. We now know that human beings are more alike genetically than any other living species. Scientifically, no one gene, or any set of genes, can support the idea of race. This section focuses on what current science knows about human variation and our species' history.

History of the Idea of Race
Race has not always existed. Sorting people by physical differences is a recent invention, only a few hundred years old. Discover how the development of the idea of race is closely linked to the early development of the United States.

 

How can it be that so many well-meaning white people have never thought about race when so few blacks pass a single day without being reminded of it? - Patricia J. Williams, columnist and legal scholar

 

Community Involvement
The Science Museum of Minnesota convened a Local Advisory Committee to help extend the impact of the exhibit in the Twin Cities community, focusing on the programs and events that will accompany the exhibition.

Several community organizations publicly support and promote the RACE exhibition. Their involvement ensures that the exhibition reaches a wider audience. LEARN MORE

RACE Newsletter - February 2007 (PDF | 270 KB)

The RaceOff video by Teja Arboleda used in the exhibit is a production of Entertaining Diversity.

www.understandingRACE.org - official website of the RACE: Are We So Different? project
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